Introduction

    This page gives a complete listing of all Berlioz’s musical works, organised into 6 tables: I. Extant works (much the largest category) II. Works written but partially or completely lost III. Unfinished works IV. Works planned but not written V. Sketches and albumleaves VI. Works of disputed authenticity. In a small number of cases it has seemed appropriate to list a particular work in more than one category (for example the opera Les Francs-Juges). Almost every work listed is linked to a page elsewhere on this site which provides more material on it.

    The lists have been compiled using various sources, especially the indispensable Catalogue of the Works of Hector Berlioz (1987) by D. Kern Holoman, which forms volume 25 of the New Berlioz Edition (NBE). Numbers preceded by H refer to the relevant entry in Holoman’s Catalogue, to which the reader is referred for full details. Reference is also made in the tables below to an article by Pierre-René Serna, "Berlioz et l’opéra: tentations, avortements, frustrations" in Hector Berlioz, ed. Christian Wasselin & Pierre-René Serna (Paris, L’Herne, 2003), pp. 187-212 (referred to as "Serna" for short, followed by page numbers). We would like to express our particular thanks to Pierre-René Serna for a number of valuable suggestions which have been incorporated in the tables below.

    In each table the works have been listed according to their date of composition, where known. The dates given should be used only as signposts. Even where a work is thought to have been composed at a particular date (for example, from the composer’s Correspondance générale; CG for short), it may well have been based in part on music written earlier (cf. here Berlioz and his music: self-borrowings), and Berlioz may also have continued to revise the work after the main period of composition. The Symphonie fantastique, for example, illustrates both points: though mainly written in 1830, the symphony is known to have incorporated music written years earlier, some of it dating even from before the time when the composer came to Paris in 1821, and Berlioz continued to revise the work in subsequent years after its first performance on 5 December 1830.

    In the tables below the page Berlioz and his music: self-borrowings is abbreviated as "Self-borrowings".

This page is also available in French 

Contents of this page:

I. Extant works

II. Works written but partially or completely lost 

III. Unfinished works

IV. Works planned but not written

V. Sketches and albumleaves

VI. Works of disputed authenticity

VII. Related pages

I. Extant works

Date of composition Title and description NBE volume
ca. 1819 Accompaniment to Fleuve du Tage (H5)
Guitar accompaniment, music by J.-J.-B. Pollet
22b
ca. 1819 Le Dépit de la bergère (H7)
Romance for voice and piano
See Self-borrowings
15
ca.1819-1821 Le Maure jaloux (H9)
Romance for voice and piano
Version I (H9A): L’Arabe jaloux – autograph survives
Version II (H9B): published 1822
15
ca.1819-1821 Amitié reprends ton empire (H10)
Romance for 3 voices and piano
Version I (H10A): autograph survives
Version II (H10B): published 1823
15
ca.1819-1822 Recueil de romances avec accompagnement de guitare (H8)
25 songs for voice and guitar, music by various composers
See also Table VI
22b
1822 Pleure pauvre Colette (H11)
Romance for two voices and piano
15
1822 Canon libre à la quinte (H14)
For two voices and piano
15
1823 Le Montagnard exilé (H15)
Chant élégiaque for two voices and piano or harp
15
1823 Toi qui l’aimas verse des pleurs (H16)
Romance for voice and piano
15
1824-1825 Messe solennelle (H20A)
First performance: 10 July 1825, Église Saint-Roch
See Self-borrowings
23
1825-1826 Scène héroïque (La Révolution grecque) (H21)
Version I (H21A): for chorus and orchestra
First performance: 26 May 1828, Salle du Conservatoire, Bloc conducting
See 1833 for Version II and Self-borrowings
12a
July 1826 Fugue (H22)
Submitted for the Prix de Rome competition
6
1825-1826
revised 1829
Fragments of the opera Les Francs-Juges (H23A; Serna p. 193-4)
First performance of overture and movements 7 and 11 on 26 May 1828, Salle du Conservatoire, Bloc conducting
See also Works written but now lost and Self-borrowings
4
1826 Grande Ouverture des Francs-Juges (H23D)
First performance: 26 May 1828, Salle du Conservatoire, Bloc conducting
See Self-borrowings
4
1826-1828 Grande Ouverture de Waverley (H26)
First performance: 26 May 1828, Salle du Conservatoire, Bloc conducting 
20
July 1827 La Mort d’Orphée (H25)
Prix de Rome cantata
Performance planned for 26 May 1828 but cancelled
See Self-borrowings
6
1828 Resurrexit (H20B)
Version II
Adapted from the Messe solennelle (see 1824-5)
First performance: 26 May 1828, Salle du Conservatoire, Bloc conducting
See Self-borrowings
12a
before 1828 Nocturne (Mélodie pastorale) (H23B)
No. 7 of the opera Les Francs-Juges (see under 1825-1826)
Version II: voices and piano
First performance: 26 May 1828, Salle du Conservatoire, Bloc conducting 
4
July 1828 Herminie (H29)
Scène lyrique
Prix de Rome cantata
See Self-borrowings
6
ca.1828? Nocturne à deux voix (H31)
Song for two voices with guitar accompaniment
15
1828 Le Roi de Thulé (H33A)
Chanson gothique (No. 6 of Huit Scènes de Faust [H33])
Version I: for soprano and piano
Version II: for soprano and orchestra – see next entry
15
1828-1829 Huit Scènes de Faust (H33)
Later incorporated in La Damnation de Faust (H111 – see 1846)
First performance (No. 3 with six students from the Conservatoire):
1 November 1829, Salle du Conservatoire, Habeneck conducting 
[3 February 1844 (No. 7), Salle Herz, cancelled]
See Self-borrowings
5
July 1829 Fugue à trois sujets (H35)
Submitted for the Prix de Rome competition
6
July 1829 Cléopâtre (H36)
Scène lyrique
Prix de Rome cantata
First performance: 1 August 1829, Institut de France (piano reduction)
See Self-borrowings
6
1829 Le Ballet des ombres (H37)
"Ronde nocturne" for voices and piano
See Self-borrowings
14
1829 Neuf Mélodies (H38)
(later called Irlande), originally for voices and piano 

No. 1 Le Coucher du soleil (H39; NBE 15)
Rêverie
First performance: 18 February 1830, Athénée musical 

No. 2 Hélène
Ballade à 2 voix
Version I (H40A; NBE 15): for 2 voices and piano
See 1844 for Version II 

No. 3 Chant guerrier (H41; NBE 14)
For tenor, bass, male chorus and piano
First performance: 5 December 1830, Salle du Conservatoire  

No. 4 La Belle Voyageuse
Ballade
Version I (H42A; NBE 15): for voice and piano
See 1834, 1842, 1851 for Versions II-IV

No. 5 Chanson à boire (H43; NBE 14)
For tenor, male chorus and piano

No. 6 Chant sacré
Version I (H44A; NBE 14): for tenor or soprano, chorus and piano
First performance: 18 February 1830, Athénée musical
See 1843 for Version II and Lost Works 1844 for Version III

No. 7 L’Origine de la harpe (H45; NBE 15)
Ballade
For soprano or tenor and piano

No. 8 Adieu Bessy
For tenor and piano
Version I (H46A; NBE 15): in A flat

See 1849 for Version II  

No. 9 Elégie en prose (H47; NBE 15) For tenor and piano
14 or 15
1830 Épisode de la vie d’un artiste (H48)
Symphonie fantastique en cinq parties  Performance planned for 3 May 1830, Théâtre des Nouveautés, cancelled 
First performance: 5 December 1830, Salle du Conservatoire, Habeneck conducting
First performed with Le Retour à la vie (see 1831): 9 December 1832, Salle du Conservatoire, Habeneck conducting
See Self-borrowings
16
July 1830 Sardanapale (H50)
Prix de Rome cantata
(only 197 bars preserved)
First performance: 30 October 1830, Institut de France, Grasset conducting
See Works Lost and Self-borrowings
6
1830 Hymne des Marseillais 
(La Marseillaise)
Arrangement: music and text by Rouget de Lisle
Version I (H51A): for double chorus and orchestra
See 1848 for Version II
22b
1830


Chant du neuf Thermidor (H51bis)
For tenor, chorus and orchestra
Arrangement: music and text by Rouget de Lisle
First performance: 3 March 1985, Davis, California, D Kern Holoman conducting
22b


1830 Ouverture de la Tempête (H52)
Later incorporated into Le Retour à la vie (H55 – see 1831)
as Fantaisie dramatique sur La Tempête
First performance: 7 November 1830, Paris Opéra Le Peletier
7
1831 Grande Ouverture du Roi Lear (H53)
First performance: 22 December 1833, Salle du Conservatoire, Girard conducting
20
1831 Intrata di Rob-Roy MacGregor (H54)
First performance: 14 April 1833, Salle du Conservatoire, Habeneck conducting
See Self-borrowings
20
1831 Le Retour à la vie 
Later called Lélio
Sequel to the Symphonie fantastique (H48 – see 1830)
Version I (H55A): Le Retour à la vie; mélologue en six parties
First performance: 9 December 1832, Salle du Conservatoire, Habeneck conducting
See 1855 for Version II and Self-borrowings
7
1831 Méditation religieuse
Version I (H56A): for chorus and wind instruments (lost)
See 1849 for Version II

1832 Quartetto et coro dei maggi (H59)
For chorus and orchestra
12a
1832 La Captive 
Version I (H60A): for voice and piano
First performance: Louise Vernet sang the work at the Villa Medici both before and after Berlioz’s stay in Rome. See also Subiaco and the chapter on Berlioz in Legouvé’s Soixante ans de souvenirs
Version II (H60B): for voice and piano
Version III (H60C): for voice, cello and piano
First performance: 30 December 1832, Salle du Conservatoire
See 1848 for Versions V-VI and Table II, 1834 for Version IV
15
before June 1833 Sur les Alpes, quel délice! (H64)
Le Chasseur des chamois. Chant suisse
For male voices, accompaniment lost
Arrangement: music by Ferdinand Huber
First performance: 6 June 1833, Hôtel de L’Europe Littéraire
22b
before July 1833 Scène héroïque (La Révolution grecque) (H21B)
Version II: for chorus and military band
First performance: planned on 28 July 1833 at Place Vendôme and then on 9 August 1833 at the Opera, both cancelled
See 1825-1826 for Version I
12a
before December 1833 Le Jeune Pâtre breton (Le Paysan breton) 
Version I (H65A): Le Paysan breton, for voice and piano
First performance: 22 December 1833, Salle du Conservatoire
See 1834, 1835 for Versions II-IV; see also 1850, under Fleurs des landes (H124)
15
1834 Le Jeune Paysan breton 
Version II (H65B): for voice and orchestra (lost)
Version III (H65C): for voice, horn and piano
See 1833 for Version I
15
1834 Les Champs 
Romance for voice and piano
Version I (H67A)
See 1850 for Version II
15
1834 Harold en Italie (H68)
Symphonie en 4 parties avec un alto principal
First performance: 23 November 1834, Salle du Conservatoire, Girard conducting
See Self-borrowings
17
1834 Sara la baigneuse
Ballade
Version I (H69A): for male quartet and orchestra (lost)
First performance: 9 November 1834, Salle du Conservatoire, Girard conducting
See 1849 for Version III and Table II, 1838 for Version II (lost)

before September 1834 Je crois en vous (H70)
Romance for voice and piano
See Self-borrowings
15
before November 1834

La Belle Voyageuse 
Version II (H42B): for male quartet and orchestra (lost)
Performed on 9 November 1834, Salle du Conservatoire, Girard conducting; Berlioz may have been one of the singers
See 1829 for Version I




before November 1835 Le Jeune Pâtre breton 
Version IV (H65D): for voice and orchestra
First performance: 22 November 1835, Salle du Conservatoire, Girard conducting
See 1833 for Version I
13
1835 Le Chant des Bretons 
Version I (H71A): for tenor or male chorus and piano
See 1849 for Version II
14
1835 Chansonette de M. Léon de Wailly (H73)
for voice and piano
See Self-borrowings
15
before November 1835 Le Cinq Mai (H74)
Chant sur la mort de l’Empereur Napoléon
For bass, chorus and orchestra
First performance: 22 November 1835, Salle du Conservatoire, Girard conducting
12a
1837 Grande Messe des morts (Requiem) (H75)
First performance: 5 December 1837, Saint-Louis des Invalides, Habeneck conducting
See Self-borrowings
9
1838 Benvenuto Cellini
Opéra semi-seria
Complete opera (76A), composed 1834-1838, extensively revised between 1852 and 1856 for performances in Weimar (1852, 1856) and London (1853, in Italian)
First complete performance, Paris 2 version: 10 September 1838, Paris Opéra Le Peletier, Habeneck conducting
First performance in Weimar: 20 March 1852,  Hoftheater, in German translation, Liszt conducting; first performance in Weimar of the revised version: 17 April (?) or 17 November 1852
First complete performance of Paris 1 version, Paris: 8 December 2003, Salle Olivier Messiaen, John Nelson conducting
See also 1838 (H76B), 1843-44 (H95) and Self-borrowings
1
1838 Grande Ouverture de Benvenuto Cellini (H76B)
First performance (as a concert piece): 6 February 1840, Salle du Vauxhall, Berlioz conducting
1
1839 Aubade 
Version I (H78A): Le lever pour la chasse for voice and 2 horns
Version II (H78B): for voice and brass (later than Version I, but the exact date is unknown)
15 and 13
1839 Roméo et Juliette (H79)
Symphonie dramatique
First performance: 24 November 1839, Salle du Conservatoire, Berlioz conducting
See Self-borrowings
18
1840 Grande Symphonie funèbre et triomphale 
Version I (H80A): for military band
First performance: 28 July 1840, in the open air under the direction of Berlioz, leading the procession of musicians which started at the Place de la Concorde and ended at the Place de la Bastille
First indoors performance: 7 August 1840, Salle Vivienne, Berlioz conducting
See 1842, 1848 for Versions II & III, and Self-borrowings
19
1840-1841 Les Nuits d’été 
Collection of six songs, issued as œuvre 7
Version I (H81A): for voice and piano

No. 1 Villanelle (H82A)

No. 2 Le Spectre de la rose (H83A)
First performance: 8 November 1840, Salle du Conservatoire, advertised but apparently not performed

No. 3 Sur les Lagunes (H84A)

No. 4 Absence (H85A)
First performance: 8 November 1840, Salle du Conservatoire, advertised but apparently not performed 

No. 5 Au Cimetière (H86A)
Clair de lune   

No. 6 L’Île inconnue (H87A)
Barcarolle

See 1843, 1856 for Version II
15
1841 Rêverie et Caprice (H88)
Romance for violin and orchestra
First performance: 1 February 1842, Salle Vivienne, Alard (violin), Berlioz conducting
21
1841 Le Freyschütz (H89)
Recitatives (in French) for Weber’s opera
First performance:  7 June 1841, Paris Opéra Le Peletier, Pantaléon conducting
22b
1841 L’Invitation à la valse (H90)
Arrangement for orchestra of Weber’s piano original
First concert performance: 1 February 1842, Salle Vivienne, Berlioz conducting
22b
1842 Grande Symphonie funèbre et triomphale 
Version II (H80B): for brass band and chorus, with strings ad libitum
First performance: 1 February 1842, Salle Vivienne, Berlioz conducting
See 1840 for Version I
19
1842 La Mort d’Ophélie
Ballade
Version I (H92A): for voice and piano
See 1848 for Version II
15
before December 1842 La Belle Voyageuse 
Ballade
(No. 4 of Neuf Mélodies [H38 – see 1829])
Version III (H42C): for mezzo-soprano and orchestra
First performance: 29 December 1842, Stuttgart, possibly Berlioz conducting, singer: Marie Recio
See 1829 for Version I
13
February 1843;
late 1855 – March 1856
Les Nuits d’été 
Collection of six songs (see 1840-1841 for Version I)
Version II (H81B): for voices and orchestra 

No. 4 Absence (H85B – February 1843)
First performance: 17 February 1843, Dresden, Berlioz conducting (with Marie Recio

See 1856 for Version II of the other songs
13
1843 Chant sacré 
(No. 6 of Neuf Mélodies [H38 – see 1829 for Version I])
Version II (H44B): for chorus and orchestra
First performance: December 1843, Marseille
12a
before December 1843 La Belle Isabeau (H94)
Conte pendant l’orage
For voice and piano
15
1843-1844 Le Carnaval romain (H95)
Ouverture caractéristique
(see also Benvenuto Cellini [H76 – see 1838])
First performance: 3 February 1844, Salle Herz, Berlioz conducting
See Self-borrowings
20
1844 Hélène 
Ballade à 2 voix
(No. 2 of Neuf Mélodies [H38 – see 1829])
Version II (H40B): for male voices and orchestra
First performance: 3 February 1844, Salle Herz, Berlioz conducting
12a
1844 Hymne à la France (H97)
For chorus and orchestra 
First performance: 1 August 1844, Festival de l’Industrie, Berlioz conducting
See also 1849, under Vox Populi (H120)
12b
1844 Three pieces for Alexandre’s orgue mélodium:
Sérénade agreste à la madone sur le thème des pifferari romains (H98)
Toccata (H99)
Hymne pour l’élévation (H100)
21
1844 Ouverture du Corsaire (H101)
Version I (H101A): La Tour de Nice
First performance: 19 January 1845, Cirque Olympique, Berlioz conducting
See 1846-1851 for Version II
(20)
1844 Marche funèbre pour la dernière scène d’Hamlet (H103)
For wordless chorus and orchestra
See also 1851, under Tristia (119B)
12
before December
1844
Le Chasseur danois 
Version I (H104A): for voice and piano
First performance: April 1846, Prague, at a dinner party
See 1845 for Version II
15
1845 Marche marocaine (H105)
Arrangement and orchestration: music by Léopold de Meyer
First performance: 6 April 1845, Cirque Olympique, Berlioz conducting
22
1845




Zaïde 
Boléro
Version I (H107A): for voice and piano (before November 1845)
Version II (H107B): for voice and orchestra (November 1845)
First performance: 29 November 1845, Vienna, Berlioz conducting
See also 1850, under Feuillets d’album (H121)
15 and 13




1845 Le Chasseur danois 
Version II (H104B): for voice and orchestra
First performance: 29 November 1845, Vienna, Berlioz conducting
13
1846 Marche de Rákóczy (H109)
Rákóczy-Indulo
Later incorporated, with a new coda, in La Damnation de Faust [H111 – see 1846 below]
First performance: 15 February 1846, Pest, Berlioz conducting
8b
1846 Chant des chemins de fer (H110)
For tenor, chorus and orchestra
First performance: 14 June 1846, Lille, Town Hall, Berlioz conducting
See also 1850, under Feuillets d’album (H121)
12b
1846 La Damnation de Faust (H111)
Légende dramatique en 4 parties
(Incorporating Huit Scènes de Faust [H33 – see 1828-1829] and Marche de Rákóczy [H109 – see above])
First performance: 6 December 1846, Opéra-Comique, Salle Favart, Berlioz conducting
See Self-borrowings
8a-b
before November 1846 Prière du matin (H112)
Chœur d’enfants
For children’s chorus and piano
14
before November 1846 Le Trébuchet (H113)
Scherzo à deux voix
For two voices and piano
See also 1850, under Fleurs des landes (H124)
15
before December 1846 Marche d’Isly (H108)
Arrangement: orchestration of a piano piece by Léopold de Meyer
First performance: 2 October 1846, New York, George Loder conducting
A manuscript of the score in the hand of Berlioz’s copyist Rocquemont is extant; the ascription of the orchestration to Berlioz is thought possible by Holoman (p. 274), but rejected without argument in NBE vol. 22 p. viii n. 3. The arrangement by Berlioz certainly existed; it is not clear that the extant manuscript is of that arrangement. See also Table II and the remarks by P.-R. Serna on this site.
not included in NBE
between 1846 and 1851 Ouverture Le Corsaire 
Version II (H101B): Le Corsaire
First performance: 8 April 1854, Brunswick, Berlioz conducting
See 1844 for Version I
20
1848 Hymne des Marseillais 
[La Marseillaise]
Arrangement: music and text by Rouget de Lisle
Version II (H51B): for tenor solo, chorus and piano
See 1830 for Version I
22b
1848 Grande Symphonie funèbre et triomphale
Version III (H80C): Apothéose, for solo voice, chorus and piano
See 1840 for Version I
14
before April 1848 La Menace des Francs (H117)
Marche et chœur
For chorus and orchestra
First performance: 25 March 1851, Salle Ste-Cécile, Berlioz conducting
See also 1849, under Vox Populi (H120)
12b
1848 La Captive
Version V (H60E): for contralto or mezzo-soprano and orchestra, in E major
First performance: 29 June 1848, London, Berlioz conducting (with Pauline Viardot)
Version VI (H60F): for contralto or mezzo-soprano and orchestra, in D major
First performance: 29 October 1848, Versailles, Berlioz conducting 
See 1832 for Version I
13
1848 La Mort d’Ophélie
Ballade
Version II (H92B): for female chorus and orchestra
See 1842 for Version I
See also 1851 under Tristia (119B)
12b
1848-1849 Te Deum (H118)
revised 1852 and 1855
First performance: 30 April 1855, Église Saint-Eustache, Berlioz conducting
See Self-borrowings
10
1849 Méditation religieuse
Version II (H56B): for chorus and orchestra
See 1831 for Version I
See also 1851 under Tristia (119B)
12b
1849 Tristia 
Version I (H119A): Collection of two works for chorus and piano, issued as Œuvre 18:
Méditation religieuse (H56 – see 1831) [reduction for chorus, violin, cello and piano by Mlle Matteman], 
La Mort d’Ophélie (H92A – see 1842)
See 1851 for Version II of Tristia

before November 1849 Adieu Bessy
(No. 8 of Neuf Mélodies [H38 – see 1829])
Version II (H46B): in G
15
before November 1849 Sara la baigneuse
Version III (H69C): for three choruses and orchestra
First performance: 22 October 1850, Salle Ste-Cécile, Berlioz conducting
See 1834 for Version I
12a
before November 1849 Le Chant des Bretons
Version II (H71B): for chorus or tenor solo and piano
First performance: Late March or early April 1853, École Chevé, Paris
See 1835 for Version I
See also 1850, under Fleurs des landes (H124)
14
before November 1849 Vox Populi (H120)
Collection of two works for orchestra and chorus, first issued in vocal score as Œuvre 20:
Hymne à la France (H97 – see 1844) and La Menace des Francs (H117 – see 1848)
12b
1850 Les Champs
Romance
Version II (H67B)
See 1834 for Version I
See also 1850 below, under Feuillets d’album (H121)
15
September 1850 Feuillets d’album (H121)
Collection of three works, issued as Œuvre 19:
See: Zaïde (H107B – see 1845), Les Champs (H67B – see 1850 above), Chant des chemins de fer (H110 – see 1846)
Later listings of his works by Berlioz include in this collection La Belle Isabeau (H94 – see 1843), Le Chasseur danois (H104 – see 1844), and Prière du matin (H112 – see 1846)

1850 Fleurs des landes (H124)
Collection of five mélodies, issued as Œuvre 13:
Le Matin (H125), romance for voice and piano
Petit Oiseau (H126), Chanson de paysan, for voice and piano
Le Trébuchet (H113 – see 1846)
Le Jeune Pâtre breton (H65C – see 1833)
Le Chant des Bretons (H71B – see 1849)
14 and 15
1850 La Fuite en Égypte (H128)
Mystère en style ancien
First performance:
Adieu des bergers, attributed to Pierre Ducré: 12 November 1850, Salle Ste.-Cécile, Berlioz conducting
Le Repos de la Sainte Famille: 3 May 1853, London, Berlioz conducting
Complete work: 1 December 1853, Leipzig, Berlioz conducting
This became part II of L’Enfance du Christ (H130 – see 1854)
11
before March 1851 La Belle Voyageuse
Ballade
(No. 4 of Neuf Mélodies [H38 – see 1829])
Version IV (H42D): for female chorus and orchestra
First performance: 25 March 1851, Salle Ste.-Cécile, Berlioz conducting
13
1851 Tristia 
Version II (H119B): Collection of three works for chorus and orchestra, issued as Œuvre 18:
Méditation religieuse (H56B – see 1849),
La Mort d’Ophélie (H92B – see 1848),
Marche funèbre pour la dernière scène d’Hamlet (H103 – see 1844)
See 1849 for Version I
12b
before July 1854 L’Impériale (H129)
Cantate à deux chœurs
For double chorus and orchestra
First performance: 15 November 1855, Palais de l’Industrie, Berlioz conducting
See Self-borrowings
12b
1853-1854 L’Enfance du Christ (H130)
Trilogie sacrée
(Incorporating La Fuite en Égypte [H128 – see 1850])
First performance: 10 December 1854, Salle Herz, Berlioz conducting
11
1855 Le Retour à la vie
Version II (H55B): Lélio, ou le retour à la vie
First performance: 21 February 1855, Weimar (in German translation), Berlioz conducting
See 1831 for Version I
7
1856 Version II (H81B) for voice and orchestra of 5 songs from Les Nuits d’été (H81A – see 1840-1841):

No. 1 Villanelle (H82B) 

No. 2 Le Spectre de la rose (H83B – between 1855-1856); first performance: 6 February 1856, Berlioz conducting 

No. 3 Sur les Lagunes (H84B) 

No. 5 Au Cimetière (H86B), Clair de lune

No. 6 L’Île inconnue (H87B), Barcarolle See 1843 for No. 4 Absence (H85B)
13
1856-1858, 1859-1861, 1863 Les Troyens (H133)
Opéra en cinq actes
Libretto by Berlioz, after Virgil

First performance (Acts 3, 4 and 5 only [Les Troyens à Carthage], in truncated form): 

4 November 1863, Théâtre-Lyrique Impérial, Deloffre conducting

First performance (complete opera): 
6 December 1890, Großherzogliches Hoftheater in Karlsruhe, Felix Mottl conducting

First complete performance in Paris: 
11 October 2003, Théâtre du Châtelet, John Eliot Gardiner conducting

See also 1864 under Marche troyenne (H133B) and Self-borrowings
2a-c
before April 1859 Plaisir d’amour (H134)
Arrangement: music by J.-P.-E. Martini
For voice and small orchestra
First performance: 23 April 1859, Opéra-Comique, Berlioz conducting
22b
September to November 1859 Orphée (not in Holoman)
Arrangement with a French libretto of Gluck’s opera, based on the Italian version of 1762 and the French version of 1774
First performance: 18 November 1859, Théâtre Lyrique, with Pauline Viardot in the title role
22a
before October 1859 Hymne pour la consécration du nouveau tabernacle (H135)
For chorus and organ or piano
14
1860 Le Roi des aulnes (H136)
Arrangement: orchestration of music by Schubert (Erlkönig)
First performance: 27 August 1860, Baden-Baden, Berlioz conducting
22b
before February 1861 Le Temple universel
Version I (H137A): for two choruses and organ
See 1867-1868 for Version II
14
1860-1862 Béatrice et Bénédict (H138)
Opéra imité de Shakespeare
Libretto by Berlioz, after Shakespeare
First performance (complete): 9 August 1862, Hoftheater, Baden-Baden, Berlioz conducting
See Self-borrowings
3
September to October 1861, July to October 1866 Alceste (not in Holoman)
Arrangement with a French libretto of Gluck’s opera, based on the Italian version of 1767 and the French version of 1776
First performance: 21 October 1861, Paris Opéra, with Pauline Viardot in the title role
1866 production, first performed on 14 October 1866, Paris Opéra
22a
1863 
(date of compilation)
Collection de 32 Mélodies (H139): Villanelle (H82A – see 1840-1841)
Le Spectre de la rose (H83B, reduction – see 1840-1841)
Sur les Lagunes. Lamento (H84A – see 1840-1841)
Absence (H85A – see 1840-1841)
Au Cimetière. Claire de lune (H86B, reduction – see 1840-1841)
L’Île inconnue. Mélodie (H87A – see 1840-1841)
Le Coucher du soleil (H39 – see 1829)
Hélène (H40A – see 1829)
Chant guerrier (H41 – see 1829)
La Belle Voyageuse (H42A – see 1829)
Chanson à boire (H43 – see 1829)
Chant sacré (H44A – see 1829)
L’Origine de la harpe (H45 – see 1829)
Adieu Bessy. Romance (H46A – see 1829)
Elégie [en prose] (H47 – see 1829)
Hymne à la France. Solo et chœur (H97, reduction – see 1844)
La Menace des Francs. Marche et chœur (H117, reduction – see 1848)
La Captive. Rêverie (H60F, reduction – see 1848)
Sara la baigneuse. Ballade à deux voix (H69C, reduction – see 1849)
Tristia. Méditation religieuse (H56B, reduction – see 1849)
La Mort d’Ophélie. Ballade (H92B, reduction – see 1848)
Le Matin. Romance (H125 – see 1850)
Petit Oiseau. Chanson de paysan (H126 – see 1850)
Le Trébuchet. Scherzo à deux voix (H113 – see 1846)
Le Jeune Pâtre breton. Romance (H65C – see 1834)
Le Chant des Bretons. Chœur (H71B – see 1849)
Zaïde. Boléro (H107B, reduction – see 1845)
Les Champs. Aubade (H67B – see 1850)
Chant des chemins de fer. Solo et chœur (H110, reduction – see 1846)
Chœur d’Enfants. Prière du matin (H112 – see 1846)
Le Chasseur danois. Chant pour voix de basse (H104A – see 1844)
La Belle Isabeau. Conte pendant l’orage (H94 – see 1843)
14 and 15
1864 Marche troyenne (H133B)
Concert arrangement of music from Les Troyens (H133A – see 1856-1858)
21
ca.1867-1868 Le Temple universel
Version II (H137B): for unaccompanied chorus
See 1861 for Version I
14
between 1861-1868 Veni creator (H141)
Motet à 3 parties sans accompagnement
For women’s voices
14
between 1861-1868 Tantum ergo (H142)
Solo et chœur pour voix de soprano et contralto
For women’s voices and organ
14
between 1861-1868 Invitation à louer Dieu (H143)
Air de Couperin mis à 3 voix égales avec accompagnement
Arrangement: music by Couperin
For women’s voices and organ
22b

 

II. Works written but partially or completely lost

Date of composition Title
ca. 1816 Arrangements of duets as trios and quartets
See Memoirs, chapter 4
Lost
1817-1819 Pot-pourri concertant sur des thèmes italiens (H1)
For flute, horn and strings
See Memoirs, chapter 4 Two quintets (H2, H3)
For flute and strings
See Memoirs, chapter 4

Romances (H4)
For voice and piano
Lost

Je vais donc quitter pour jamais (H6)
For voice, guitar or piano to a text by Florian
Used in the opening theme of the first movement of the Symphonie Fantastique (bars 3-16 and 27-42); cf. Memoirs, chapter 4
1822 Le Cheval arabe (H12)
Cantata after C.-H. Millevoye

Canon à 3 voix (H13)

Both works, now lost, were presented to Lesueur when Berlioz first met him
1823 Estelle et Némorin (H17; Serna p. 191-3)
Opera, libretto by Gerono
It may have included Je vais donc quitter pour jamais (H6)
Lost
Winter 1823-1824 Le Passage de la mer Rouge (H18)
Oratorio with Latin text
Lost
1823-1824 Beverley, ou le joueur (H19)
Dramatic scene to a text by B.-J. Saurin
Lost [see NBE 21 pp. X and 83]
1825-1826 Les Francs-Juges (H23)
Opera in about 15 movements, libretto by Humbert Ferrand
Revised 1829
The overture, four movements and fragments of other movements have been preserved
See Table I, 1825-1826
July 1827 Fugue (H24)
Submitted for the Prix de Rome competition
Lost
before May 1828 Marche religieuse des Mages (H27)
Performed on 26 March 1828, Salle du Conservatoire
Perhaps later reused for the Quartetto et coro dei maggi (H59 – see Table I, 1832)
Lost
July 1828 Fugue (H28)
Submitted for the Prix de Rome competition
Lost
ca.1828 Là ci darem la mano (H30)
Variations for guitar on the theme from Mozart’s Don Giovanni
Lost
1828-1829 Salutaris (H32)
For three voices and organ or piano
Lost
1829 Chanson des pirates (H34)
Text from Victor Hugo’s Orientales
Perhaps reused in the Scène de brigands, third movement of Le Retour à la vie (H55 – see Table I, 1831)
Lost
July 1830 Fugue (H49)
Submitted for the Prix de Rome competition
Lost
1830 Sardanapale (H50)
Prix de Rome cantata
Fragments (197 bars) have survived, published in NBE vol. 6
See Table I, 1830
1831 Méditation religieuse 
Version I (H56A – see Table I, 1831): for chorus and 7 wind instruments
Lost
Version II, for chorus and orchestra, is extant: see Table I, 1849
September 1831 Chœur (H57)
Text by Berlioz
Lost
Late 1831 Chœur d’anges (H58)
Lost
1831-1833 Le Dernier Jour du monde (H61)
Oratorio based on a scenario by Berlioz
Perhaps abandoned in favour of later projects like the Requiem (H75 – Table I, 1837)
Lost
1833 La Chasse de Lützow (H63)
Arrangement: music by Weber
For male voices, strings and piano
Performed on 6 June and 24 November 1833
Lost
1833 Romance de Marie Tudor (H66)
For bass and piano, text by Victor Hugo
Performed on 22 December 1833
Lost
before November 1834 La Belle Voyageuse
Version II (H42B): for male quartet and orchestra
Performed on 9 November 1834, Salle du Conservatoire, Girard conducting; Berlioz may have been one of the singers
Lost
See Table I, 1829 for Version I (extant)
before November 1834 La Captive
Version IV (H60D): for soprano and orchestra
Performed on 23 November 1834, Salle du Conservatoire, Girard conducting
Lost
See Table I, 1832 for the other versions (extant)
before November 1834 Le Jeune Paysan breton (H65B)
Version II: for soprano and orchestra
Performed on 23 November 1834, Salle du Conservatoire, Girard conducting
Lost
See Table I, 1833 for the other versions (extant)
1834 Sara la baigneuse
Ballade
Version I (H69A): for male quartet and orchestra
Performed on 9 November 1834, Salle du Conservatoire, Girard conducting
Lost
See 1838 below for Version II (lost) and Table I, 1849 for the extant version (III)
1835 Fête musicale funèbre (H72)
2 out of 7 movements were completed; a performance planned for 22 November 1835 was cancelled; 
The work was perhaps a further development of Le Dernier Jour du monde (H 61) and the Retour de l’armée d’Italie (H 62 – Table V), and was later integrated in Le Cinq Mai (H74 – Table I, 1835), the Requiem (H75 – Table I, 1837) and the Symphonie funèbre et triomphale (H80A – Table I, 1840)
Lost
before March 1838 Sara la baigneuse (H69B)
Ballade
Version II: for mixed-voice quartet, chorus and orchestra
Performed on 13 December 1840, Salle du Conservatoire, Berlioz conducting
Lost
See above, 1834
1844 Chant sacré (H44C)
Version III: for 6 wind instruments invented or built by Sax and orchestra
Performed on 3 February 1844, Salle Herz, Berlioz conducting
Lost
See Table I, 1829 (Neuf Mélodies) and 1843 for the extant versions
1844 Scène de la comédie [act III, scene 2] (H102)
One of three movements intended as incidental music for a production of Hamlet at the Odéon Theatre, in Léon de Wailly’s translation of the play 
The other two were based on La Mort d’Ophélie (H92 – Table I, 1842) and the Marche funèbre pour la dernière scène d’Hamlet (H103 – Table I, 1844), but this piece may never have been composed (thus Kern Holoman, p. 264)
before December 1846 Marche d’Isly (H108)
Arrangement: orchestration of a piano piece by Léopold de Meyer
First performance: 2 October 1846, New York, George Loder conducting
A manuscript of the score in the hand of Berlioz’s copyist Rocquemont is extant; the ascription of the orchestration to Berlioz is thought possible by Holoman (p. 274), but rejected without argument in NBE vol. 22 p. viii n. 3. The arrangement by Berlioz certainly existed; it is not clear that the extant manuscript is of that arrangement. See also Table I and the remarks by P.-R. Serna on this site.
1848 Chant du départ (H115)
Arrangement: music by Méhul, text by Chénier
Mourons pour la patrie (116)
Arrangement: music and text by  Rouget de Lisle
Both were patriotic works for soloists and chorus, and were to be published by Beale in London
If written, both are lost
1853 Marche pour la musique des Guides (not in Holoman)
March for the imperial band of the Guides, commissioned for the celebration of Napoleon III’s wedding on 30 January but not performed; mentioned in a letter to Liszt of 23 February (CG no. 1568)
Lost, though the music may have provided material for the Trojan March in Les Troyens

 

III. Unfinished works

Date of composition Title and description
1831-1833


Le Dernier Jour du monde (H61 and Serna p. 198-200)
Oratorio based on a scenario by Berlioz
Perhaps abandoned in favour of later projects like the Requiem (H75 – Table I, 1837)
Lost
1833-1834

Le Cri de guerre du Brisgaw (H23C)
Incomplete intermezzo in one act based on Les Francs-Juges (H23 – Table I, 1825-1826)
(Libretto in NBE, vol. 4, Appendix II pp. 333-6)
1835




Fête musicale funèbre (H72)
2 out of 7 movements were completed; a performance planned for 22 November 1835 was cancelled; 
The work was perhaps a further development of Le Dernier Jour du monde (H 61) and the Retour de l’armée d’Italie (H 62 – Table V), and was later integrated in Le Cinq Mai (H74 – Table I, 1835), the Requiem (H75 – Table I, 1837) and the Symphonie funèbre et triomphale (H80A – Table I, 1840)
Lost
1835-1839


Érigone (H77)
Intermède antique, text after P. S. Ballanche
The manuscript libretto and fragments of an autograph score, dating from 1838-1839, have been preserved [see NBE 21 pp. X-XI and 85-92]
1841-1842



La Nonne sanglante (H91 and Serna p. 203-4)
Incomplete opera
Libretto by Eugène Scribe; abandoned about 1844, briefly re-examined in 1847; libretto assigned to Gounod in 1853
Two complete movements, and significant fragments of some other movements have been preserved; they are published in NBE 4
1848




Chant du départ (H115)
Arrangement: music by Méhul, text by Chénier
Mourons pour la patrie (116)
Arrangement: music and text by Rouget de Lisle
Both were patriotic works for soloists and chorus, and were to be published by Beale in London
If written, both are lost
1866 Armide (not in Holoman)
Arrangement with a French libretto of Gluck’s opera, for a production at the Théâtre-Lyrique with Mme Charton-Demeur in the title role; the project was abandoned (cf. CG nos. 3083, 3092, 3110)
 

 

IV. Works planned but not written

Date  Title
ca. 1823? Les Noces d’or d’Obéron et de Titania
Opera or cantata, to a libretto by Humbert Ferrand
Serna p. 193 and his article on this site; dates the project to 1823 against Holoman p. 423 who places it ca. 1832 (see below)
ca. 1826 La Mort d’Hercule
Opera in three acts, to a libretto possibly by Stéphen de La Madelaine
Holoman p. 422; Serna p. 194-5
1826-1827 Richard en Palestine
Opéra-comique after The Talisman by Scott, to a libretto by Léon Compaignon
Holoman p. 422; Serna p. 194
1826-1828 Robin-Hood
Opera, to a libretto by Humbert Ferrand
Holoman p. 423; Serna p. 195
1828 Virginius (not in Holoman)
Opera, based on Livy (cf. CG no. 94)
Serna p. 197
1828-1830 Atala
Opera, after Chateaubriand to a libretto by an unknown author
Holoman p. 423; Serna p. 198
1829 Lara (not in Holoman)
Opera, on a libretto by Stéphen de La Madelaine (cf. CG no. 123)
Serna p. 198
1830 Othello (not in Holoman)
Opera, on a libretto by Rouget de Lisle (cf. Memoirs ch. 29 and CG nos. 196, 198)
Serna p. 198
ca. 1832? Les Noces des fées
Opera or cantata, to a libretto by Humbert Ferrand
Holoman p. 423; but see above under ca. 1823
1832 An opera on a libretto by Eugène Süe (not in Holoman; cf. CG no. 293, 314)
Serna p. 200
1833 An opera, not identified (not in Holoman; cf. CG no. 314)
Serna p. 201
1833 Les Brigands
Dramatic scene, after Die Räuber by Schiller, to a libretto initially by Thomas Gounet, then by J.-N. Brouilly
Holoman p. 423; Serna p. 201
1834 "A large opera in 3 acts on a historical subject that had not yet been treated", on a libretto by Léon de Wailly (not in Holoman; cf. CG no. 408)
Serna p. 203
1834, 1844 Hamlet
Opera, after Shakespeare, to a libretto by Léon de Wailly
Holoman p. 424; Serna p. 201-2
1838 Settings of verses by Édouard Turquety
Holoman p. 424
1843 Plainchants de l’Église grecque
Arrangements for 16-part chorus
Holoman p. 424
ca. 1847 Méphistophélès
Opera, incorporating La Damnation de Faust (H111 – see Table I, 1846), with additional libretto by Scribe
Holoman p. 424; Serna p. 195-7
1847 An opera in 3 acts, to a libretto written in French by Alphonse Royer and Vaës, for the 1848-1849 season of the Drury Lane Theatre in London
Holoman p. 425; Serna p. 204
1847 God Save the Queen
Arrangement of the British national anthem for the opening night of Jullien’s season in London
Holoman p. 425
1850 Music to a text by Humbert Ferrand
Holoman p. 425
1851 Jeanne d’Arc
Setting to music of a series of poems by the Abbé Arnaud, Canon of Poitiers
Holoman p. 425
ca. 1852 Symphony in A minor
Berlioz dreamed of this work for two consecutive nights but resisted the temptation to write it (see Memoirs, chapter 59, where he describes this episode)
Holoman p. 426
1858-1860 An Opera on the Thirty Years’ War
To a libretto by Édouard Plouvier, to fulfil Bénazet’s commission for Baden-Baden
The project was later abandoned in favour of Béatrice et Bénédict (H138 – see Table I, 1860-1862)
Holoman p. 427; Serna p. 207
1859 Roméo et Juliette
An opera after Shakespeare
Apparently suggested to Berlioz by Princess Carolyne Sayn-Wittgenstein; he had previously thought of the possibility, but declined (CG no. 2361). Another suggestion was an opera on Christopher Columbus (ib.)
Holoman p. 426; Serna p. 205-6
1859 Cléopâtre
An opera after Shakespeare
Also suggested to Berlioz by Princess Carolyne Sayn-Wittgenstein; Berlioz was initially attracted by the idea (cf. CG nos. 2423, 2430, 2442, 2449), but did not follow it up
Holoman p. 426; Serna p. 207-8
1862 Salammbô
An opera based on Flaubert’s novel
Serna p. 209
1865 "A vast symphonic poem", which Berlioz declared he would like to write for Estelle Fornier: "only through the medium of the orchestra" would he be "able to express what he feels" (CG no. 3002)

 

V. Sketches and albumleaves

Date of composition Title and description NBE volume
1832-1836 Sketchbook of 1832-36 (H62), includes sketches for: Dans l’alcôve sombre, to a text by Hugo
Le Retour de l’armée d’Italie, symphonie militaire en 2 parties
Harold en Italie
(H68 – see Table I, 1834)
La Captive (H60D – see Table II, 1834)
Benvenuto Cellini (H 76 – see Table I, 1838), including Chansonette de M. Léon de Wailly (H73 – see Table I, 1835)
See 21, pp. X and 83-4
1836 Albumleaf in B flat major 21, pp. XI, 93, 171
1842-1848 Souvenirs – Bêtises – Improvisations (H93)
Album kept by Berlioz on his concert tours, 1842-1848, with some 20 citations from Berlioz’s works, three of them original
21, pp. XI, 94-5, 172
1844 Albumleaf (H96)
Andantino in E major for keyboard
21, pp. XI, 95, 173
1845 Le Vent gémit (H106)
Sérénade, text by Méry
Albumleaf
21, pp. XI and 96
1847 Nessun maggior piacere (H114)
Albumleaf
15
1851 Albumleaf, Je resterai 21, pp. XI and 96
1852 Albumleaf for Eduard Silas (H127), 2 bars 21, pp. XI and 97 [also NBE 25, p. 323]
1855 Valse chantée par le vent dans les cheminées d’un de mes châteaux en Espagne (H131)
Albumleaf
21, pp. XI and 97 (beginning only)
ca. 1855-1856 Au bord d’une rivière (H132), 26 bars
Exercise on an experimental scale
21, pp. XI and 93
1861 Albumleaf in G major, 4 bars 21, pp. XI-XII and 97
1868 Albumleaf in C major, 5 bars 21, pp. XII and 97
1868 Albumleaf in G minor, 10 bars 21, pp. XII, 97, 173
date? Albumleaf in F major, 2 1/2 bars 21, pp. XII and 97
date? Double albumleaf, C major and C minor, 4 + 4 bars 21, pp. XII and 97
date? Salut matinal (H140)
Improvisé en langue et en musique kanaques
Albumleaf
Reproduced in Jacques Barzun, New Letters of Berlioz 1830-1868 (New York, 1954), facing p. 43
21, pp. XII and 97

VI. Works of disputed authenticity

ca. 1818-1820 A book of 56 pieces for guitar and 32 romances with guitar accompaniment, in different handwritings, from the Berlioz family house in La Côte-Saint-André (not in Holoman)
According to Hugh Macdonald none of the handwritings is that of Berlioz, and there is no proof that any of the pieces were actually composed by him (source: our personal communication)
Note: these are distinct from the 25 songs (H8) for which the young Berlioz wrote guitar accompaniments – see Table I, 1819-1822
not included in NBE
before September 1850 Chant des chérubins (H122)
Arrangement (?): music by Bortniansky
Latin text possibly by Berlioz
First performance: 22 October 1850, Salle Ste-Cécile, Berlioz conducting
not included in NBE

before September 1850

Pater noster (H123)
Arrangement (?): music by Bortniansky
Latin text by possibly Berlioz
First performance: 28 January 1851, Salle Ste-Cécile, Berlioz conducting
not included in NBE

VII. Related pages

Berlioz and his music: self-borrowings  
Berlioz Biography   
Berlioz Libretti  
Berlioz: Musical and Literary Works
(contains a detailed listing of the contents of the New Berlioz Edition)
Berlioz Music Scores   
Berlioz Discography

The Hector Berlioz Website was created by Monir Tayeb and Michel Austin on 18 July 1997;
Berlioz: A Listing of his Musical Works created on 1 August 2005, revised 1 September 2005 and 15 April 2006.

© 2005-2014 Monir Tayeb and Michel Austin. All rights of reproduction reserved.

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