The Hector Berlioz Website

Berlioz: Pioneers and Champions

Tom S. Wotton

Hector Berlioz

INDEX

Adam, Adolphe Charles, 76
Africaine, L’ (Meyerberr), 183
Allix, G., 31 note
Alterations to scores, H.B.’s, 5, 62, 68, 87, 93, 114, 117, 126, 130, 131, 147, 152, 156, 183, 198
— — — Editorial, 108-10, 115, 124, 140, 169, 179, 181-91, 203
Appoggiatura, 63, 64
Auber, Daniel F. E., 74, 184
Augmentation, H.B.’s use of, 128, 187
Autographs.   See Manuscripts

Bach, Johann Sebastian, H.B.’s dislike of his harmony, 62 ; 97, 117
Balakirev, Mily Alexeievich, on H.B.’s conducting, 174 ; alterations in ‘German edition’, 182-4
Balcon de l’Opéra, le (d’Ortigue), 25
Barbier, Frédéric Étienne, on H.B.’s voice, 58 note
Barthe, Adrien, 50
Bass instruments of orchestra, 118, 119
Bassoons, number of, 109, 110, 120, 166, 179, 189, 204
Battre aux champs, 103 note
Beecham, Sir Thomas, on H.B.’s melodies, 72
Beethoven, Ludwig van, criticized by H.B., 66, 77 ; his bassoon parts, 109 ; contradictory nuances, 116 ; symphonies altered by Fétis, 143 ; use of Lydian mode, 165 note ; H.B.’s conducting of, 174 ; character, 194
Berlioz, Adèle (Mme Suat), sister, 5, 37
— Dr. Louis Joseph, father, 5 ; health, 13 ; objects to son’s marriage, 34 ; death, 139

BERLIOZ, HECTOR (Louis Hector).
The Man.

Contemporary opinions, 3 ; character disclosed in his writings, 3, 195 ; prose works, 4 ; start in journalism, 196 ; dislike of journalism, 4 ; correspondence, 5-7 ; his Memoirs, 7 seq. ; the ‘snuff-box’ episode, 7-9 ; his reputed inaccuracies, 9-12, 195-200 ; dates of vote for Charles Blanc and death, 11; character described by Saint-Saëns, 12, 18-19 ; admires Goethe and Shakespeare, 12 ; a child of the Revolution, 12 ; his mal du siècle, 13 ; wanderings after seeing Hamlet, 13 ; shyness, 13 ; studies science, enters Conservatoire, 14 ; privations, 14 ; fails to obtain Prix de Rome, 14 ; self-described hypersensitiveness, 16-17 ; feeling for music, 17 ; intimacy with Liszt and Saint-Saëns, 18 ; entrusts piano arrangement of Lélio to the latter, 18 ; his naivety, 19, 35 ; his account of the engagement to Camille Moke and Épisode bouffon, 19 ; pushfulness, 20, 22 ; mal de l’isolement, posing and vanities, 21 ; desire for marriage, 22 ; his petty vengeances, 23

Legend of his ‘eccentricity’, 24 ; he joins the Romantics, 25 ; inspires account of his behaviour at theatre, 25 ; the women in his life, 26 ; restraint in depicting love-scenes, 27, 157 ; affair with Camille Moke, 27-31 ; her jilting, 41-4 ; his quinsy, 41 ; resolves to commit murder, 41-3 ; pillories Camille and mother in print, 44 ; infatuation for Harriet Smithson, 32 ; emotions at second performance of Fantastic Symphony, 33 ; determines to marry, 34 ; serves sommations, marriage, 34 ; alleged infidelities, 36-8 ; separates from Harriet but provides for her, 36 ; reflections on her death, 37 ; relations with Marie Recio, 38-40 ; second marriage, 50

[Berlioz, Hector]
The Musician.

A composer without direct imitators, 2, 192 ; of lofty ideals, 193 ; of the 1830’s, 2 ; style unaltered during life, 3, 68 ; alleged extravagances and fondness for the horrible, 45, and haphazard musical education, 48 ; supposed inability to write basses, 48-50, 60

His harmonic principles, 51-71, 126, 166, 206 ; teachers, 52 ; rejects older systems, 52 ; faults unduly stressed, 54 ; approval of Schumann, 54, Kœchlin, 54, 60, 67, 70, 117 ; Newman, 61 ; no pianist, 57 ; a player on flute and guitar, 55 ; his performance described, 58 ; probable influence of guitar on harmony, 55-9 ; shocked at Bach’s harmonies, 62 ; objects to appoggiatura, 63 ; criticizes prelude to Tristan, 63 ; comments on score of opera, 64 ; objection to enharmony, 71

His melody, 72-6, 79, admirers and critics, 72-4 ; ability to depict character in music, 74 ; ‘literary and artistic element’, 75, 76, 92 ; ‘Amen’ fugue, 76 ; views on fugue, and ability to compose them, 77, 164 ; Cherubini and Prout thereon, 77 ; alleged lack of form, 78 ; dictum on form, 80 ; search for suitable forms, 81 ; use of themes and invention of idée fixe, 82 ; relation to programme music, 83 ; methods of development and construction of overtures, 85-8, illustrated by King Lear, 88-91 ; inspiration stmulated by poetry or physical shock, not directly by scenery, 94, 131 ; gains reputation of supporting programme music, 93, 97 ; construction of Ball Scene in Romeo and Juliet, 97

His orchestration, 99-121 ; grandiose ideas, 99-100 ; his ability to write for small forces, 100, 166, 168 ; preference for large forces, 100 ; his concert orchestra and curious notice thereon, 101 ; ‘architectural’ works and orchestras, 102, 103 ; feeling for balance and contrast, 103 ; delicacy and perfection of detail, 104 ; his works dependent on proper strength and disposition of forces, 104 ; first purely orchestral composer, 107 ; use of horns, 107, 108 ; bassoons, 109 ; notation of harp harmonics, 110 ; influence on later composers, 112, 113 ; comparison with Wagner, 112 ; care in writing playable parts, 113, 114 ; retouches and alterations, 114 ; contrary nuances, 116 ; trombone pedals, his ‘hive of pedal bees’, 118, 119

His works, 122-72 ; not to be studied at the piano, 122 ; objection to Liszt’s transcription, 122 ; songs a suitable avenue of approach, 123 ; the five collections, their contents described, 124-30 ; attempts at ‘local colour’, 128 ; price for his Romances, 129 ; duets, 130, 131 ; cantatas, 131-9 ; utilization of old material, 133-4 ; fondness for setting religious words, 141 ; intention in producing Lélio, 144

His small output of instrumental music, 146 ; real domain opera, 146 ; his conservative tendencies, 149 ; Beatrice and Benedick, ill-health during composition, 152 ; the Fantastic Symphony, his ‘disregard of fundamental rules’, 153 ; Romanticism, 155 ; attempts Teutonic methods, 156 ; hard work and long hours, 157 ; early Mass, his emotions during performance, 161 ; the Requiem, frenzied work on the text, 162 ; Te Deum, his double fugue, 164 ; his poetic gifts, 172

A magnetic conductor, 173 ; conflicting impressions of his style, 174-5 ; rhythmic precision and observation of tempos, 175 ; care over metronomic indications, 175 ; not a good proof-reader, 191

His originality antipathetic to many, 193

[Berlioz, Hector]
Compositions.
Note: An asterisk prefixed to a title indicates a work projected, destroyed, or surviving in an incomplete form.

Absence, harmonics censured, 69, 126 ; number of instruments required, 70 note
Adieu, Bessy, alterations, 62
‘Amen’ Fugue. See Damnation of Faust
Beatrice and Benedick, opera, 128, 150, 151, 206
— — Overture, 86
Benvenuto Cellini, opera, 2, 47, 87, 123, 128, 134, 142 ; failure, 146 ; the score unpublished, 147, 191 ; revised and produced at Weimar, 147 ; further altered, 148
— — Overture, its melodies, 72 ; orchestration, 158 ; phrasing, 203 note
Bretons, Song of (Le Chant des Bretons), 124
Brigands’ Song, The (Lélio), 144
Captive, The, approaches a symphonic poem, 82 ; 124, 125, 129 ; versions and singers, 130
Cemetery, At the (Au cimetière), 125, 126
Champs, Les, 127
Childhood of Christ, The, 3, 165 ; described, 166-8
Corsair, The, overture, 88 note, 92, 109, 172, 189, 204
Damnation of Faust, The, concert opera, 11, 27 ; its music ‘cleanly classical’, 46 ; 68, 72, 74, 107 note, 114, 117 ; adaptation for stage performance, 147, 149, 168 ; description, 169-71, 174 ; substitutions for ophicleide parts, 179-81, 189 ; correction of the proofs, 191 ; ‘Amen’ fugue, 76, 77, 179-81, 189 ; Chorus of Sylphs, 132, 142 ; Hunt, 107 note ; Invocation to Nature, its harmony, 67, 68, 150 ; King of Thule, its literary element, alteration after the ‘Eight Scenes’, 92, 93 ; Pandæmonium, 104, 169, 189 ; Rakoczy March, its nuances, 116, 132 ; time of composition, 199 ; Ride to the Abyss, 68, 96, 104, 119, 169, 189 ; Soldiers’ Chorus, 79
Danish Hunter, The (Le Chasseur danois), 128
Death of Napoleon, The. See Fifth of May
— — Ophelia (Tristia), 130
— — Orpheus, rejected for Prix de Rome as unplayable, 135 ; described, 135-8
*— — Sardanapalus, 8, 103, 134 and note, 138
*Derniers Instans de Marie Stuart, Les, 157

Eight Scenes from Faust, 57 note, 68, 75, 92, 93, 108, 169
Elegy, 13 ; origin, 129 ; time of composition, Boschot’s doubts, 169
Erl King (Schubert), Arrangement of, 107 note
Fantastic Symphony, The, 2, 5, 15, 16, 18, 23 ; first performance in revised form, 25, 26, 32, 33 ; 54, 59 ; employment of idée fixe, 82 ; the programme, 93, 97 ; 117, 129, 145 ; form of first movement, 152, 205 ; romanticism, 154 ; editorial indications, 185, 198
— Waltz, 185 note ; its phrasing, 82, 202 ; Scene in the Fields, 82 ; March to Execution, 47, 66, 94, 96, 101, 104 ; its origin and character, 154, 198 ; Witches’ Sabbath (Sabbat), 47, 77, 82, 104, 155, 206
*Faust, projected symphony, 15
Feuillets d’album, 125
Fifth of May, The (Le cinq mai), 2, 125, 131-3, 198
Fisherman, The (Le Pêcheur), 124, 144
Fleurs des Landes, 125
Francs Juges, Les, opera, libretto refused by Opéra, 146 ; probable source of the March to Execution, 154, 198 ; 199
— — — overture, H.B.’s first instrumental work, 85, 86, 102 ; arranged for military band, 103, 142 ; 117, 123 ; error in German edition, 187 ; its whole-tone scale, 202
Fugues, 77, 78
Funeral and Triumphal Symphony, 2 ; for military band, 102 ; adjustments necessary for concert rooms, 159, 160 ; Wagner’s high praise, 173
Funeral March for Hamlet (Tristia), 119, 130 ; described, 139-40, 204
Harold in Italy, symphony, 2, 4, 5 note, 8, 46 ; the theme, 82, 97, 133, 156 ; 92, 102, 109, 128, 177 ; Pilgrims’ March, 97, 141 ; Finale (Orgy), 5 note ; H.B.’s description, 46, 155 ; a foreshadowing of Tannhaüser, 156
Herminia, submitted for Prix de Rome, 14, 134 ; the prayer arranged, 138
Heroic Scene, 187
Hymn for the Consecration of the New Tabernacle, 142

Impériale, L’, 103, 134
Invocation. See Cleopatra ; Romeo and Juliet
— to Nature. See Damnation of Faust
Irlande, 125, 138
‘Judex crederis.’ See Te Deum
King Lear, overture, 2 ; described 88-92, 122, 153
King of Thule, The. See Damnation of Faust
Lagoons, On the (Sur les lagunes), 107 note, 125
Lélio, monodrama, 18 ; continuation of the Fantastic Symphony, 97, 117, 124, 137, 143 ; a collection of pieces from several sources, 143 ; a gesture of defiance, 144 ; its production, 145
Little Bird (Petit Oiseau), 127
March to Execution. See Fantastic Symphony
*Mass (Messe solennelle), 138, 177, 181
Mélodies irlandaises, 124
— Trente-trois, 125, 175
Menace of the Franks, The, 142
Messe des morts. See Requiem
Morning (Le Matin), 127
Morning Prayer (Prière du matin), 130
*Nonne sanglante, La, projected opera, 146
Nuits d’été, Les. See Summer Nights

Rakoczy March. See Damnation of Faust
Religious Meditation (Tristia), 130, 140
Requiem (Grande Messe des morts), 2 ; first performance, 7, 100 ; forces employed, 100, 102, 104, 113 ; its trombone pedals, 118-19, 138, 141, 142, 160 ; H.B.’s desire that it might be spared, 161 ; description, 162, 163 ; tempi, 176
— Dies Irae — Tub mirum — the fanfare, 102, 104, 163, 176, 177, 202
— Hosanna, 77, 163 ; Hostias, 118, 138, 163 ; Sanctus, 117, 163
Rêverie et caprice (violin piece), 84
Rob Roy, overture, 2 ; ‘burnt’, 92 ; 128, 133, 146 ; utilized for ‘Harold’ themes, 157
Roman Carnival, The, overture, 2 ; cor anglais melody, 72  ; construction, 86, 87, 109, 133 ; correct speed, 177
Romeo and Juliet, symphony, 2, 27, 63, 82, 97, 114 ; circumstances of composition, 157 ; description, 157-9 ; 189
— — — Ball scene, 85 ; origin, 97 ; 158
— — — Funeral Procession, 109, 142, 158
— — — Invocation, 114, 158
— — — Love Scene, 17 ; Wagner’s criticism, 84, 85, 157 ; the German editing, 186
— — — ‘Premiers Transports’, 124
— — — Scherzo, 110, 176
Royal Hunt, The. See The Trojans
Rustic Serenade to the Madonna (Sérénade agreste à la Madone), for harmonium, 128
Sabbat, Le. See Fantastic Symphony
Sacred Song (Chant sacré), 138, 139
Sara la baigneuse, 2, 132, 142
Snare, The (Le Trébuchet), 130
Song of Happiness (Chanson de bonheur) (Lélio), 124, 137
Spectre of a Rose, The, 126
Summer Nights (Les Nuits d’été), 2, 125, 206

Tantum ergo, 142
Te Deum, 47, 77, 102 note, 141, 151 ; more mature than Requiem, 163 ; described, 163-6, 181
— — Judex crederis, 47, 102, 119, 121 ; considered by H.B. his finest creation, 163
Tempest, Fantasia on The (Lélio), composed as an overture, its production, 144, 171, 172
Toi qui l’aimais, 127
*Tower of Nice, The, overture, altered into The Corsair, 92, 172
Tristia, contents, 130, 140
Trojans, The, opera, 7, 47 ; legend of its revision, 48, 80 ; the vocal score inadequate, 122 ; 128, 134 ; the unpublished autograph, 147 ; its plan not wholly successful, 150 ; time needed for performance, 151 ; H.B.’s finest work, 151, 161 ; a full score needed, 191
Trojans, The, Prelude to The Trojans at Carthage, 119, 172
— The Royal Hunt, 27 note ; the piano arrangement, 49, 50
‘Tuba mirum’. See Requiem
Unknown Land, The (L’Île inconnue), 126
Veni Creator, 142
Villanelle, 125, 127
Voyageuse, La Belle, 127, 132
Waverley, overture, 86
Young Breton Shepherd, The (Le Jeune Pâtre breton), 127
Zaïde, 128

[Berlioz, Hector]
Literary Works.

A travers chants, 4, 16, 76, 131
Aperçu sur la musique dramatique et la musique romantique, 16
Art of the Conductor, The (included in 2nd ed. of Treatise on Instrumentation, &c.), 175
Euphonia (in La Gazette musicale), 44
Grotesques de la musique, Les, 4, 179
Memoirs, 4 ; doubts cast on their accuracy, 7, 196, 197 ; but not by H.B.’s contemporaries, 7 ; contain much information on contemporary European music, 9 ; Rolland on their exaggerated errors, 12 ; 14, 27, 28, 39, 40 ; do not claim to be confessions, 45 ; 52, 129, 191
Soirées de l’orchestre, Les, 4, 44
Suicide par enthousiasme, Le (in Voyage musical), 43
Treatise on Instrumentation and Orchestration, 111, 116-18, 131, 132, 160
Voyage en Dauphiné (in the Memoirs), 40 note
Voyage musical en Allemagne et en Italie, 4, 19, 27

[Berlioz, Hector]
Collected Correspondence.

Années romantiques, Les, 31
Au milieu du chemin, 37, 122
Briefe an Franz Liszt, 6, 123
— von Hector Berlioz an die Fürstin Carolyne Sayn-Wittgenstein, 80
Correspondance inédite, 1, 5, 42, 77, 94, 100, 123, 199
Lettres inédites de Hector Berlioz à Thomas Gounet, 31
— intimes, 5, 196
Musicien errant, Le, 32
For other correspondence see under Bülow, Desmarest, Ferrand, Liszt, Morel, Samuel

Berlioz, Madame, I. See Smithson, Harriet
— — II. See Recio, Marie
— Nanci (Anne Marguerite), sister, 58, 81
‘Berlioziana’, 14, 49, 84, 124, 126, 134, 146
Bernard, Daniel, 42
Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, x, 64, 134, 135, 183
Bizet, Georges, his harp notation, 111 note
Blanc, Charles, H.B.’s vote for, 11, 45
Bohain, scenarist of ‘Faust’ ballet, 169
Boieldieu, François Adrien, introduces harp harmonics, 110 ; distressed by H.B.’s harmony, 117
Boris Godunov (Mussorgsky), 205
Boschot, Adolphe, unsympathetic biographer of H.B., 9-11, 19 ; doubts suicide story, 34, 35, 38, 39 ; quotes H.B.’s letter to Vernet, 42 ; 62 ; discovers score of Orpheus, 135 ; on inception of Hamlet March, 139 ; 149 ; influenced by Malherbe, 188 ; unfair and incredulous attitude, 197-201 ; and flippancy, 203
Bottée de Toulmon, on first performance of Requiem, 100
Bourges, Maurice, on form of first movement of Funeral Symphony, 160
Brussels, H.B.’s visit to, 39, 40 ; The Childhood of Christ at, 167, 168
Bülow, Hans von, 6, 115 ; arranger of Tristan, 122 ; helps to alter libretto of Cellini, 148 ; 202

Catel, Charles, theorist, his treatise studied by H.B., 52, 58, 192
Cauchie, Maurice, on wrong tempi, 177
Cavé, Edmond Ludovic Auguste, 9
‘Chant-récitatif’, 150, 167
Chateaubriand, François René, Vicomte de, 12, 13
Cherubini, Maria Luigi, head of Conservatoire, 9, 15, 23, passes H.B. as writer of fugue, 77, 78 ; 160
Chords, in root position, H.B.’s fondness for, 59
— of the 9th, 11th, and 13th, 65, 66
— — — unprepared dominant 7th, 117
Clarinet, The, 120, 138
Colonne, Édouard, conductor of H.B.’s works, 105, 179
Concertstück (Weber), incident over, 44
Conservatoire, Paris, 14, 25, 52, 59, 69, 124, 127 ; legatee of H.B.’s autographs, 147
Cornelius, Peter, translates libretto of Cellini, 148
Cornet, First employment of, 137
Correspondant, Le, journal, 16, 197
Corsaire, Le, journal, 196
Côte-Saint-André, La, 58
Croix, Pierre de la, medieval composer, 117
Cui, César, on H.B.’s conducting, 174
Cymbals, used with piccolo, 116-18

Dame Blanche, La (Boieldieu), 110
Daphnis et Chloé (Offenbach), 65
Das Leben ein Traum (Klose), 180
Dauphinois, their character, 23
Deldevez, Édouard M.E., corrects H.B.’s proofs, 191
Dernier Roi de Juda (Kastner), 139
Desmarest, ’cellist, 128-30
Destranges, Étienne, 151 note
Dieren, Bernard van, 152
Dietsch, Pierre Louis Philippe, conductor, 168, 169
‘Distant Cannon’, meaning of, 132
Divided violins, Use of, by H.B., 117
Donizetti, Gaetano, 184
Dorant, H.B.’s guitar teacher, 58
Dresden, 113, 173, 179, 180, 182
Drum, Bass, 116, 132
Drums, Snare, muffled, 140, 164, 204
Dubœuf, Estelle (Mme Fornier), 21, 27, 32, 43, 45, 134, 135, 158, 206
Dvořák, Antonin, 80 note

Eckstein, Ferdinand, Baron d’, 196
Edition, The German (B. & H.), incompleteness, 47 ; 104 note ; alterations in horn parts, 108 ; in bassoon parts, 109 ; other alterations and errors, 131, 175, 179-91, 203, 204
— ‘Philharmonia’, 87, 88, 177
Editions, French, engravers‘ errors, 116, 191 ; their rarity, 204
—  Miniature Scores, 104, 108, 168 note, 169 note ; faithful copies of French editions, 191
Elgard, Sir Edward, 119
Engel, Louis, 9 note
Enharmony, 71
Épisode bouffon, 19, 27, 45, 195
Ernst, Alfred, on H.B.’s comments on Tristan, 64-6
Estelle. See Dubœuf, E.

Falcon, Marie C., vocalist, 130
Faust (Goethe), 12, 75, 170, 171
— Ballet, Projected, 68, 169
Ferrand, Humbert, correspondent of H.B., 5-9, 23, 31, 32, 34, 35, 42, 129, 132, 141, 155, 157, 161, 196, 199
Fétis, François Joseph, 54, 65, 69 ; alters Beethoven’s symphonies, 143, 144 ; alters L’Africaine, 183
Flayol, 8, 9
Florence, 41
Flying Dutchman, The (Wagner), 54
Form in music, 78-96, 160, 206
Fornier, Madame. See Dubœuf, E.
Fouque, Octave, 174 note
Fugue, H.B.’s views on, 77, 78, 164

Gautier, Théophile, poems set by H.B., 125
Gazette musicale, La, 4, 44, 100, 101, 142, 157, 160
Gerono, Hyacinthe Christophe, teaches harmony to H.B., 52, 59
Girard, Narcisse, conducts incompetently, 8, 177
Girod, Abbé Louis, 77
Gluck, Christoph Willibald von, 4, 44, 53, 55, 62, 149, 192
Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von, 12, 144, 170, 171
Gossec, François Joseph, his double orchestra, 99 ; army of serpents and drums, 102 note
Gounet, Thomas, 31, 138
Gounoad, Charles, 56, 158
Grasset, Jean Jacques, conductor, ruins finale of Sardanapalus, 8
Guiraud, Jean Baptiste, 135
Guitar, The, as affecting H.B.’s harmony, 55, 57-60
— Tuning of the, 57, 58
Gunsbourg, Raoul, stages H.B.’s Faust, 168, 169

Habeneck, François Joseph, conductor, 7-9
Harmony, H.B.’s principles of, 52-71, 126, 166, 206
Harp harmonics, Notation of, 110, 111
Haslinger, Karl, publisher, 128
Haydn, Franz Josef, quartets studied by H.B., 52, 81
Hebrides, The (Mendelssohn), noticed by H.B., 4
Heine, Heinrich, H.B.’s open letter to, 47, 155
Heller, Stephen, arranges accompaniment of The Captive, 124 ; on prologue of Romeo and Juliet, 159
Herbeck, Johann von, 174
Hernani (Hugo), 143
Hérold, Louis Joseph Ferdinand, 118 ; abuse of appoggiatura, 63 ; use of trombone pedal, 118
Herzog, Frau, vocalist, 149
Hiller, Ferdinand, 23 ; on the Moke affair, 28-31, 41 ; 140, 199
Hippeau, Edmond, 8, 11 ; on the Moke affair, 28-30 ; on H.B.’s marital conduct, 35, 38, 39 ; on appoggiatura, 63 ; on the Memoirs, 197
Histoire de l’instrumentation (Lavoix), 183
Hofmeister, Friedrich, 123
Horn, The natural and valve, H.B.’s use of, 107, 108
— Closed notes and mutes on, 104 note, 108
— The German, 120
Hueffner, Francis, on H.B.’s conducting, 44
Hugo, Victor, 45, 143, 146
Huldigungsmarsch (Wagner), 160
Huré, Jean, 48

Idée fixe, 82, 97, 134
Inspiration, 91, 94, 95, 131
Instrumentation, defined, 106
Invitation to the Waltz (Weber), instrumentated by H.B., 107

Janin, Jules, 35
Jomelli, Nicola, 60
Journal des Débats, H.B.’s review of Le Prophète, 3 ; on H.B.’s Memoirs, 8 ; H.B.’s notice of Wagner’s Paris concerts, 63
Juive, La (Halévy), 108
Jullien, Adolphe, biographer of H.B., doubts ‘snuff-box’ incident, 8 ; on attempted suicide, 35 ; attributes H.B.’s errors to faulty memory, 39, 40

Kapp, Julius, 70 note
Kastner, Georges, on trombone ‘pedals’, 118 ; early use of saxophone, 139
Kemble, John, Harriet Smithson a member of his company, 25, 33
Kling, Henri, on H.B.’s conducting, 175
Klose, Friedrich, his modern use of ophicleide, 180
Kœchlin, Charles, theorist, 54 and note ; on H.B.’s harmony, 54, 60, 67, 70 ; the unprepared dominant 7th, 117 ; H.B.’s ‘feeling for counterpoint’, 164
Kreutzer, Rodolphe, 192
Kufferath, Maurice, 66 note
Künstlerleben (Hiller), 28

L. E. (?Louis Engel), 9
Latte, Bernard, 129
Lavoix, Henri (fils), on first use of saxophone, 139 ; on H.B.’s replacement of ophicleides by tubas, 183
Lecocq, Charles, 73
Legouvé, Ernest, playwright, mistake in dates, 11 ; responsible for charges of infidelity against H.B., 35-40 ; describes jealous conduct of Mme B. (Harriet Smithson), 37 ; on H.B.’s singing and playing, 58
Lesueur, Jean François, composer, teaches harmony to H.B., 52, 53, 59 ; contemplates a gigantic orchestra, 99 ; inspires H.B.’s taste for religious themes, 142 ; on Greek modes, 165 note
Levi, Herman, 66
Liszt, Franz, friend and correspondent of H.B., 6 ; their first meeting, 18 ; originates symphonic poem, 82 ; transcribes King Lear, 122, 123 ; produces Benvenuto Cellini at Weimar, 147, 148 ; comments on Tannhaüser overture, 159 ; his delineation of Mephistopheles, 171 ; transcribes Fantastic Symphony, 185
‘Local Colour’, in H.B.’s music, 128
London, 21, 44, 130

Machaut, Guillaume de, medieval composer, 117
Macpherson, Stewart, on H.B.’s melody, 72, 79 ; on modifications of Sonata form, 80 note
Mahler, Gustav, 113
Mal de l’isolement, 27, 45, 141
du siècle, 13
Malherbe, Charles, on discovery of H.B.’s autobiographical notes, 25 ; inspirer of Boschot, 43, 200 ; alters arrangement of bassoons in H.B.’s scores, 110 ; dies before completing edition of Cellini, 147 ; his defective equipment and blunders as co-editor of German edition, 183-91
Mannheim School, 206
Manns, Sir August, 113
Manuscripts, 25, 135, 147, 150 note, 164, 169, 190
Marnold, Jean, condemns H.B.’s modulations, 67
Marseilles, 139
Martin, Marie. See Recio, Marie
Masson, Paul Marie, 48 ; on H.B.’s melody, 74, 76, 78 ; 147 note
Méhul, Étienne Nicolas, 99, 160, 192
Melody, Form in, 72 seq.
Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix, music appreciated by H.B., 4 note ; on H.B.’s desire to marry, 22, 43 ; employs ophicleide, 180
Ménestrel, Le, 6, 14, 49, 64, 84
Mephistopheles, 27, 171
Meredith, George, 81
Metronomic indications, 140 note, 175-7, 187
Meyer, Léopold, 146
Meyerbeer, Giacomo, 3
Midsummer Night’s Dream, A (Mendelssohn), 68
Modes, Greek, Employment of, 165, 167
Moke, Camille (Marie Félicité Denise M.), saves H.B. from breakdown, 14 ; becomes engaged to H.B., 19 ; object of Hiller’s attachment, flirts with and jilts H.B. to marry Pleyel, 27-33, 41 ; pilloried in H.B.’s writings, 43, 44 ; accuses him of an orchestral breakdown, 44 ; misconduct and separation from Pleyel,, 19 note
Moke, Mme, 20, 29, 31, 41, 43, 44
Monteverdi, Claudio, 117
Moore, Thomas, quoted by H.B., 136 ; his poems adapted for setting, 138, 140
Morel, Auguste François, 6
Morillot, Paul, on the March to Execution, 47
Morris, R.O., on testing harmonies at the piano, 56
Mort d’Adam, La (Lesueur), its curious score, 53 note
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus, his harmony unknown to H.B., 55, 80 note ; delight in an enlarged orchestra, 99 ; his Requiem given in Paris, 100
Murger, Henri, 24
Musset, Alfred de, 13, 22
Mussorgsky, Modest P., 67, 205
Mutes, used by H.B., for horn, 104 note, 108, 137 ; for trombone, 137

Newman, Ernest, on H.B.’s ‘extravagance’, 45 ; harmonic system, 61, 70 ; Absence, 126 ; expression of similar ideas by similar melodies, 134 ; Fantastic Symphony, 153 ; phrasing, 203 ; on Beethoven, 194
Nice, 91
Nikisch, Arthur, 115
Nuances changed in German edition, 115 note, 189
— contradictory, 116

Oberon, Overture (Weber), 97
Odéon, Théâtre de l’, H.B.’s conducting at, 25
Offenbach, Jacques, 65
Opéra, Paris, appearance of Marie Recio, 38 ; stage band, 99 ; refuses Les Francs Juges, 146 ; owns score of Cellini, 147 ; stages the Damnation of Faust, 179
Ophicleide, The, sole brass bass in French orchestras, 11 ; its compass, 118 ; how superseded, 179-81 ; when altered by H.B. to tuba, 183 ; in German edition, 189
Orchestral technique, Recent advances in, 107, 113, 120
Orchestras, Balance of, 103-5
— Gigantic, in France, 99, 100 ; under H.B., 102, 103
Orchestration, 99-121 ; definition, 106 ; Wagner’s, 107
Ortigue, Joseph d’, 25, 168

Paganini, Nicolo, his gift to H.B., 157
Pannain, Guido, on programme music, 83
Parsifal (Wagner), 112
Pasdeloup, Jules, 84
‘Pedal’ notes of trombone, 118, 119
Percussion, 115, 116
Performances, Brussels, 168 ; Dresden, 113, 179 ; London, 44, 130 ; Marseilles, 139 ; Monte Carlo, 168 ; Paris, 135, (Les Invalides) 100, (Opéra) 179, (St. Eustache) 162, (Trocadéro) 176 ; St. Petersburg, 174 ; Vienna, 180 ; Villa Medici, 130 ; Weimar, 145, 147
Phrasing, 168 note, 202, 203
Pianoforte, as guide to harmony, 56, 57, 126
Piccolo, The, 117, 178
Pierné, Gabriel, and Henry Woollett, on H.B.’s orchestration, 104, 105 ; on Wagner’s, 112 ; on H.B.’s followers, 113
Pizzicato, 57, 132
Pleyel, Camille, pianist (husband of Camille Moke), 19, 28, 31, 41
— Ignaz Joseph, composer, 52, 81
— Mme. See Moke, Camille
Pohl, Richard, 86 note
Prague, 200
Prix de Rome, 14, 15, 41, 53, 59, 133, 134, 138, 144
Prod’homme, Jacques G., 31
Programme music, 83-5, 96-8
Prophète, Le (Meyerbeer), review by H.B., 3
Prout, Ebenezer, theorist, on chords of the 11th and 13th, 65 ; defines melody, 73 ; on H.B.’s ability to write fugue, 77
Psalmodies, in H.B.’s works, 141
Purcell, Henry, 117

Raff, Joseph Joachim, 111, 160
Rameau, Jean Philippe, his theory of harmony rejected by H.B., 52, 53 ; collected edition of his works, 184
Ravel, Maurice, 67, 178
Recio, Marie (Marie Martin), second wife, her jealousy, 6 ; appearance at Opéra, 38 ; marriage, 40
Reicha, Anton J., teacher of counterpoint to H.B., 52, 53
Requiem (Mozart), performed in Paris, 100
Resemblances in music, Unconscious, 133, 134
Revue de Paris, notice of Fantastic Symphony inspired by H.B., 25
Revue européenne, 197
Rey, Étienne, 36, 38
Reyer, Ernest, 8, 21, 176
Richter, Hans, 115
Ricordi, publisher, 147, 161
Rienzi (Wagner), 99, 104, 181
Riga, 139
Rimsky-Korsakov, Nikolas A., on orchestration, 106 ; H.B.’s conducting, 174 ; edition of Boris Godunov, 205
Ring, The (Wagner), 112, 113, 162
Rochefoucauld, Vicomte de la, 20
Rolland, Romain, 12, 34
Romantics and romanticism, 16, 23, 25, 154
Rome, 6, 16, 21, 28, 31, 41-3, 134, 140, 161
Ross-Despréaux, Guillaume, 15
Rossini, Gioachino Antonio, 116, 138, 149
Rubato, disliked by H.B., 175
Russian School, The, 112

Saint-Saëns, Camille, first meeting with H.B., 18 ; arranges Lélio, 18 ; appreciations, 12, 18-20, 35 ; witness of Mme Viardot’s piano arrangement, 49, 50 ; plays over Gounod’s scores, 56 ; on Offenbach’s harmony, 65 ; on enharmony, 71 ; declares H.B. artist rather than musician, 76 ; H.B.’s scores not to be judged by reading, 130 ; on need for strict observation of indications, 176 ; uses ophicleide, 180 ; objects to Fétis’s alterations to L’Africaine, 183 ; on the Memoirs, 195
Samson and Delilah (Saint-Saëns), 195
Samuel, Adolphe, 3, 6, 170
Sax, Adolphe, recent inventions used by H.B., 139
Saxophone, The, 139
Sayn-Wittgenstein, Princess Carolyne, 6, 158
Scarlatti, Alessandro, 117
Schönberg, Arnold, 119
Schubert, Franz, 20, 74
Schumann, Robert, on H.B.’s harmony, 54, 55, 61 ; on form of Fantastic Symphony, 205
Scots wha hae, introduced into Rob Roy, 128
Seidl, Anton, describes H.B.’s conducting, 173, 174
Serpent, The, 181, 182
Shakespeare, William, 12, 89, 181
Shaw, George Bernard, on melodic form, 73 ; on Amen fugue, 76
Sibelius, Jean, 153
Smith, S. C. Kaines, 117
Smithson, Harriet, first wife, 15, 22, 25, 26, 29 ; introduction to H.B., 32 ; her theatrical failure, 33 ; presence at second performance of Fantastic Symphony, 33 ; marriage, 34 ; jealousy, 36 ; lack of success, intemperance, illness, and death, 36-8 ; date of leaving Paris, 199 note
Sonata form, 95, 96
Spohr, Ludwig, 80 note
Spontini, Gasparo, sender of piston instruments to Paris, 137 note ; his music admired by H.B., 55, 149
Stopped notes, on horn, 108
Strasburg, 135
Strauss, Richard, 83, 113, 130 ; edits H.B.’s Treatise, 160
Stravinsky, Igor, 67
Strings, number required by H.B., 101, 105
— — omitted in German edition, 204
Suat, Marc (brother-in-law), 40
Subiaco, 130
Sue, Eugène, 58
Symphonic poem, The, 82, 83, 172
Symphony, The Choral (Beethoven), 66, 73, 156
— , The Pastoral (Beethoven), 96
— — — , in C minor (Beethoven), 65, 145

Tajan-Rogé, D., 32
Tannhaüser (Wagner), 114, 156, 159
Tayau, Marie, violinist, 84
Tempo, Observation of, 123, 149, 151, 175, 177, 178
Thomas, Ambroise, 147
Tiber, The, 94, 131
Tiersot, Julien, 8, 14, 30, 31, 49, 84, 124, 126 note, 127, 134, 146, 154, 159, 169, 182, 184
Till Eulenspiegel (Strauss), 113
Toscanini, Arturo, 115, 175
Tourte bow, The, 107
Triment, Baron de, 42
Tristan and Isolda (Wagner), score presented to H.B., 63 ; his criticisms, 64-6
Trombone, The, 116, 118-21, 160, 179, 180, 182, 188
Trumpet, The, 120
Tuba, The, 119, 179, 181, 183, 189
Twilight of the Gods (Wagner), 151

Urhan, Chrétien, violist, 133

Vernet, Horace, 42, 43, 201
— Louise, vocalist, 130
Vestale, La (Spontini), admired by H.B., 44, 149 ; his ‘performance’, 58, 59
Viardot, Mme Pauline, arranges the Royal Hunt for piano, 48-50 ; sings The Captive, 130
— Paul (son), legend about H.B.’s basses, 48, 49
Vienna, 128, 174, 180
Volbach, Fritz, on substitute for ophicleide, 179
Vries, J. H., 142 note

Wagner, Cosima, account of H.B.’s conducting, 173
— Richard, an unsatisfactory pupil, 52 ; age at composition of Flying Dutchman compared with H.B.’s, 54 ; meets H.B. in London, 21 ; presents score of Tristan to H.B., 63 ; criticizes Love Scene in Romeo and Juliet, 84, 85 ; his stage band in Rienzi, 99 ; his orchestra, 112 ; assists H.B. at Dresden concert, 113 ; reticence in use of percussion, 115 ; his works available through piano scores, 122 ; ideas on opera differ from those of H.B., 150 ; influenced by Love Scene, 158 ; his conducting criticized, 174 ; use of ophicleide, 180
Walpurgis Night, The first (Mendelssohn), 4 note
Weber, Carl Maria von, 2, 44, 119
Weber, Johannes, on The Ride to the Abyss, 96
Webern, Anton, 64
Weckerlin, Jean Baptiste Théodore, 124, 184
Weimar, 6, 145, 147, 148
Weingartner, Felix, on melodies in Cellini overture, 72, 73 ; on a change of tempo in aria of opera, 149 ; disregards indications in performance of Requiem, 176 ; responsibility as co-editor of German edition, 184, 186, 188
Wieprecht, Wilhelm, arranges Les Francs Juges for military band, 103, 142
William Tell (Rossini), Fantasia on, 139
Wilson, Christopher, on Funeral March for Hamlet, 140
Woollett, Henry. See Pierné, Gabriel, &c.

Zampa (Hérold), 63, 118

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Page Berlioz: Pioneers and Champions created on 15 March 2012; this page created on 1 August 2018.

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